Scott Parker

Council Member|sparker@kiawahisland.org

My wife Colleen and I are retired physicians, practicing first in Indianapolis, Indiana, and later in Greenville, South Carolina. We were introduced to Kiawah through a former part-time resident. After our third or fourth visit, we were thoroughly enchanted and bought our first home here in September 2004. After my retirement, we became full-time residents in 2013 and built our current home in 2014.

In my professional life, besides the practice of medicine, I had management and operational responsibilities. While in Indiana, I was the managing partner for my seven-person practice and led the merger of three other private practice groups into a 21-person practice. In 1997 our practice was acquired by a publicly-traded professional practice management company. In 1999 Colleen and I moved to Greenville, SC, where I became the laboratory medical director for Palmetto Health Baptist Easley Hospital. Later the hospital was jointly owned by what is now Prisma Health. During my time, I progressed to Hospital Medical Director for Clinical Quality and Safety and the last five years, served as Chief Medical Officer.

Since retirement, I have been active and involved with my new community. I was a volunteer tutor in mathematics at both Frierson Elementary on Wadmalaw and Haut Gap Middle School on Johns Island. I was involved with the Barrier Islands Free Medical Clinic fundraising efforts, leading their main fundraising event for four years. I have served both on the Public Safety Committee and am currently on the Board of Zoning Appeals. I am an avid golfer and duplicate bridge player and am the current President of the Charleston Bridge Center.

I want to thank you for your show of confidence by electing me to serve for the next four years. I will be serving as the liaison between the Town Council, KICA, the Conservancy, and the town’s Environmental Committee as they work collaboratively on those environmental issues confronting us, such as sea level rise/climate change, bobcat population declines, and research to help better understand and provide for measurable metrics to guide our groundwater table and march management plans.